Lenovo Legion Y520 15.6-Inch Full HD Gaming Laptop

The Legion Y520 ($849 to begin; $1,249 as tried) isn’t Lenovo’s first gaming laptop, yet it denotes a new beginning for the organization in that market. The Y520 is the inaugural individual from the new Legion arrangement, and it establishes a solid first connection. The laptop’s smooth decreased look and the solid execution of its Intel Core i7 CPU and Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti GPU make it simple to prescribe this machine to gamers on a financial plan. In any case, clients should beat a few disturbances, including a dull screen and an ineffectively planned touchpad.

Display:

Any setting not as much as most extreme brilliance makes it about difficult to perceive what’s on the Legion’s 15.6-inch, 1080p screen. Over that, the show experiences dull hues. When I watched a full-HD trailer for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, Gamora’s green skin was pale and stale, as though she had recently observed a phantom. In the meantime, the purple stripe down Nebula’s face was clear, yet the blue on the sides of her head mixed with her dark colored and red vest.

The screen was still a little dim when I played Mass Effect: Andromeda, as territories in the shadows were totally dark. A couple of hues popped, however, similar to an Asari duelist’s violet shield when she remained in a dim storage.

The Legion’s screen covers only 68 percent of the sRGB shading extent – a less than impressive display that scarcely outperformed the Inspiron’s 67 percent, and that screen was frightful. The normal standard journal flaunts 94 percent of the sRGB shading range, while the Strix (124 percent) and Prestige (133 percent) were more distinctive.

In any case, the hues you can see are precise. The Legion has a Delta-E score of 0.2 (0 perfect), which is much better than the normal (2.4), and in addition scores from the Inspiron (12), Prestige (5) and Asus (2.2).

The board on Lenovo’s notepad isn’t brilliant, either. It quantified 220 nits on our light meter, falling beneath the normal (276 nits), the Strix (285 nits) and the Inspiron (253 nits). Of this gathering, just the Prestige was dimmer, at 192 nits.

Design:

I’m a devotee of the unobtrusive look Lenovo is running for with its new “Army” line of scratch pad. The cover is dark plastic with a woven example and a couple of lines that influence it to look forceful yet at the same time receptive. A progression of meshes on the back wrap around to the base of the PC and edge two arrangements of vents, which influences them to appear to be more similar to a deliberate improvement than an innovative need. Despite the fact that it’s made of plastic, the Legion Y520 feels strong. It’s obvious to see the material utilized as a part of the frame for a spending gaming notepad, yet I do welcome that it feels like I can stick it in a pack and not need to stress over it.

When you lift the top, you’ll locate the 15.6-inch, 1080p show with a thick bezel; a red, illuminated, island-style console; and a touchpad. The touchpad is encompassed by a red line and, strangely, some plastic that edges it as a trapezoid as opposed to a rectangle (more on that later).

At 15 x 10.4 x 1 inches and 5.6 pounds, the Legion is pleasant and versatile. The Dell Inspiron 15 7000 is marginally bigger and heavier, at 15.2 x 10.8 x 1 inches and 5.8 pounds, and the MSI PE60 Prestige is also measured, at 15.1 x 10.2 x 1.1 inches and 5.4 pounds. The Asus ROG Strix GL753VE, which has a 17-inch show, is obviously bigger and heavier, at 16.3 x 10.7 x 1.3 inches and 6.4 pounds.

The left half of the Legion has a Kensington bolt space, a power jack, an Ethernet jack, a USB 2.0 port and an earphone jack. On the correct side, you’ll discover a USB Type-C port, an SD card per user, a couple of USB 3.0 ports and an HDMI yield.

 

Keyboard and Touchpad:

There’s in no way like a decent Lenovo console, and the Legion Y520’s is a joy to type on. It’s like the immense arrangement of keys you’ll discover on the organization’s shopper items, similar to the Yoga 710. With 1.8 millimeters of vertical travel and 77 grams of power required to press the keys, the console is super comfortable. I sped along on the 10fastfingers.com writing test at 115 words for each moment (higher than my normal scope of 107 to 112 wpm) with my typical 2 percent blunder rate. I valued the delicate touch deck, which kept my wrists pleasant and comfortable. My most loved expansion to the console, however, is the devoted catch to record gameplay. My lone genuine protest is that it’s illuminated just in red.

The touchpad, however, is unbalanced. It’s a topsy-turvy trapezoid with bits of plastic filling in what might be whatever remains of the standard square shape. This is an exemplary instance of shape over capacity, and it was a genuine torment to utilize. The highest point of the trackpad is 4.1 inches in length, and the base is 3.5 inches (making it a trapezoid), and it’s 2.2 inches tall. While exploring Windows, I frequently wound up finding the plastic and unobtrusively reviling to myself. On the off chance that you don’t hit the sides, it’s extraordinary at perceiving signals.

Audio:

The speakers by the Legion’s pivot are sufficiently noisy, yet you don’t get the greater part of the detail in your music. When I tuned in to Yellowcard’s “Sing For Me,” the guitars and vocals were clear, yet the drums were on the peaceful side and the bass was relatively indistinct. I wish the speakers were only a smidge louder, yet at max volume, the sound effectively filled a little gathering room.

I had a comparative involvement in Mass Effect: Andromeda. The noisy, beating electronica in the multiplayer campaign sounded incredible, yet a portion of the radio calls amid the diversion were too tranquil and were overwhelmed by gunfire.

The laptop accompanies the Dolby Audio application and a couple of sound profiles to look over, yet I found that abandoning it on the default Music setting offered the best outcomes. Sound alternatives are additionally accessible in Lenovo’s Nerve Center (see Software and Warranty, underneath).

Gaming and Graphics:

For a passage level illustrations card, the Legion Y520’s Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti 4GB of VRAM is the genuine article. I played on Mass Effect: Andromeda’s multiplayer mode, fighting off swarms of Remnant robots with my colleagues on High settings at 1080p, and the amusement remained in the vicinity of 38 and 50 outlines for every second.

The Legion ran Rise of the Tomb Raider (1080p, Very High settings) at 46 fps, cruising past the standard normal (34 fps), the Inspiron and the Strix (both at 22 fps with 1050 Ti GPUs), and the Prestige (18 fps, GTX 1050). Of the four, just the Legion ran the diversion over our 30-fps playability limit.

It was additionally the main framework that could deal with Metro: Last Light on High at 1080p. The Legion played it at 31 fps, simply over the limit. The Inspiron (29 fps), the Strix (28 fps) and the Prestige (26 fps) were lower, and the normal is 34 fps.

Lenovo’s laptop rendered Hitman (1080p, Ultra settings) at a smooth 60 fps, beating the normal (56 fps) the Strix (40 fps), the Prestige (39 fps) and the Inspiron (35 fps).

Performance:

Pressed with a 2.8-GHz Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU; 16GB of RAM; a 256GB PCIe SSD; and a 2TB, 5,400-rpm HDD, the Legion is prepared to complete work once you’ve got done with gaming. I had 40 tabs open in two occurrences of Google Chrome, including one gushing a 1080p scene of “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” and didn’t see even a trace of slack when looking over or exchanging tabs.

The Legion indented a score of 13,037 on the Geekbench 4 general execution test, conveniently outperforming the standard notepad normal (11,455) and the opposition. The Inspiron (10,363, Intel Core i5-7300HQ), the Strix (12,394, Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU) and the Prestige (12,678, Intel Core i7-7700HQ) all had brought down scores.

The Legion exchanged 4.97GB of blended media records in 14 seconds, which means a rate of 363.5 MBps. That outpaces the normal (193.9 MBps) and also the Prestige (231.3 MBps), the Strix (221.3 MBps) and the Inspiron 15 (106 MBps).

It took 3 minutes and 19 seconds for the Legion to finish our OpenOffice spreadsheet full-scale benchmark, which sets 20,000 names and addresses. That is the same as the Strix and in front of the normal (3:57). The Inspiron finished the test in 3:37, and the Prestige completed in 3:39.

Battery Life:

The Legion may be versatile, yet you’ll have to carry a charger with you. It persisted for only 3 hours and 39 minutes on the Laptop Mag Battery Test, which peruses the web constantly finished Wi-Fi. The normal for a standard scratch pad is 7:06, and the majority of the opposition outlived the Legion. The Prestige persisted for 4:13, the Strix made due for 6:25 and the Inspiron kept running for an astounding 11:23.

Heat:

The Legion remained decent and cool in our normal testing. In the wake of gushing HD video from YouTube for 15 minutes, it quantified 83 degrees Fahrenheit on the last, 80 degrees at the focal point of the console and 77 degrees on the touchpad.

It was as yet agreeable after I played Mass Effect: Andromeda, estimating 77 degrees on the touchpad. The console and base of the framework estimated 87 degrees (aside from the base vent, which hit 105 degrees). We view anything under 95 degrees as agreeable.

Webcam:

The 720p webcam’s photographs are on the delicate side as far as detail, yet the hues are exact. In a photograph I took in our labs, my periwinkle shirt showed up as it does, in actuality.

It got some fine points of interest, as well, similar to the inconspicuous example in our lab tech’s shirt as he photobombed me, and my dimple emerged. Some light rolling in from the windows was extinguished, however not to a degree that occupied from the focal point of the photograph.

 

Configurations:

The Legion Y520 we explored costs $1,249.99 and accompanies an Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU; 16GB of RAM; a 2TB, 5,400-rpm HDD; a 256GB PCIe SSD; and a Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti with 4GB of VRAM.

In the event that you needn’t bother with that much space, you can get a $1,179.99 variant that has similar specs, aside from it utilizes a 1TB HDD and a 128GB SSD.

The base model costs $849 and highlights a Core i5-7300HQ CPU; 8GB of RAM; a 1TB, 5,400-rpm HDD; and a Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti with 4GB of VRAM.

Bottom Line:

The Lenovo Legion Y520 is a spending gaming laptop with a smooth, decreased outline and an agreeable console. What’s more, above all, it offers solid execution at the cost. In the event that exclusive it had a brighter, more clear screen and didn’t have irritating plastic around the trackpad, it would be stunningly better.

In the event that you need a laptop that shouts “gaming PC,” consider the Asus ROG Strix GL753VE, which is $1,229 and has a vastly improved show and longer battery life. Simply realize that its plan isn’t as decent, and its gaming execution isn’t as great.

On the off chance that you can look past the screen, however, the Legion Y520 is a strong decision that will work well for you when you’re gaming and keeping in mind that you’re grinding away.

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